Second and Much Expanded Edition, In Contemporary Calf
MOORE, Jonas. Mathematical Compendium. or, Useful practices in arithmetick, geometry, and astronomy, geography and navigation, embattelling, and quartering of armies, fortification and gunnery, gauging and dyalling. Explaining the logarithms, with new indices; Nepairís rods or bones making of movements, and the application of pendulums; with the projection of the sphere for an universal dyal, &c. By Sir Jonas Moore, Knt. late surveyor general of his Majestyís Ordínance. The Second Edition, with any large Additions. London: Printed for Robert Harford , 1681.
[With separate title-page but continuous collation]:

A Table Of Artificial Sines And Tangents, For Every Degree And Minute Of The Quadrant, Fitted To The Size Of The Logarithms. London: Printed for Robert Harford, 1679.

Second and much expanded edition. Two parts in one twelvemo volume (5 x 2 7/8 inches; 125 x 73 mm). 24, 120, [178], [2, advertisements] pp. With one engraved folding plate (often lacking) and six engraved plates in the text, two of which are tipped in and folding. With numerous tables labeled "Brigg's Logarithms." With final advertisement leaf. First title-page in double-ruled border. The folding plates are as such, folding engraved perpetual calendar mounted on A1r; folding scale mounted on F5v; folding engraved plate of latitude calculations bound after page 120. This second edition with "many large additions" has nearly 100 pages more than the first edition.

Full contemporary mottled calf, rebacked to style. Boards double-ruled in blind. Edges speckled red. Spine lettered in gilt. Corners slightly bumped. Final advertisement leaf trimmed a bit close on fore-edge. Overall a very good, clean copy.

Regarding the first edition, "his notes were edited by his Ordnance second clerk, Nicholas Stephenson, to form a pocket-book, Mathematical Compendium (1674)." (DNB)

"Handbook of applied mathematics first published in 1674, including instructions for using the elementary mechanical calculating device known as "Napier's Bones," a distant forerunner of the computer, developed in the early 1600s by John Napier, the inventor of logarithms." (Swann Galleries)

"Sir Jonas Moore (1617-1679) was a practical mathematician, teacher, and author who, when unable to make a living as a tutor and professor of mathematics, rose to prominence in the Restoration court of Charles II, after demonstrating his value as a surveyor and cartographer. On being appointed to the high office of Surveyor General of the King's Ordnance, he used both his income and his influence with the King to become a patron of navigational astronomy. An able mathematician (he is best known for his work in trigonometry and the development of the 'cos.' in mathematical equations), his enduring importance derives from his strong support of mathematics and astronomy which made many other mathematical and astronomical advances possible." (DNB).

ESTC R269. Wing M2573.

HBS # 68247 $3,000