Legal Pamphlet Attempting to Examine the Legal and Constitutional Basis For the 14th Amendment
ADRIAANS, J.H. Has a Negro the Right to Vote? Or, the Validity of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution Denied. A Historical Compilation from Original Sources and Review from a Legal Standpoint. Washington D.C.: Printed for the Author , 1908].
Legal pamphlet examining the legal and constitutional basis for the 14th amendment. Octavo (8 1/4 x 5 3/8 inches; 210 x 137 mm). 26, [6] pp. With errata in red on the back outer wrapper.

Bound with staples in original printed wrappers. Wrappers printed in black on front and a red errata on back wrapper. Some minor creasing and and a tiny closed tear to wrappers. Overall very good.

“While the subject herein treated has been , and is, a bone of contention between the two great political parties, and has thus to a greater or less extent been regarded as a partisan issue, the author has complied the within information from a broad standpoint of a citizen, desiring the welfare of the Country more than the welfare of any political party. To this end the author has furnished copies of within compilation to the recognized leaders of both the rest political parties that they might make such use thereof, not by antagonism, but by co-operation, as would bring a peaceful solution to a vexed question that increasingly disturbs the economic conditions of this Country. Subjoined letters of acknowledgement were received by the author from Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States; Alton B. Parker and W. J. Bryan, candidates for President on the the Democratic ticket; Elihu Root, Secretary of War and of State; and letters of commendation from other in public life.” (From the Preface).

“The 14th Amendment, approved by Congress in 1866 and ratified in 1868, granted citizenship to all persons “born or naturalized in the United States,” including former slaves, and guaranteed “equal protection of the laws” to all citizens.” (History dot com)

In this legal pamphlet, J.H. Adriaans, attempts to deny the validity of the 14th amendment based on such legal examples as the case of Dred Scott vs Stanford. His suggestion of the invalidity of the 14th amendment would therefore revoke the voting rights of black people in America. Fortunately, his suggestions were unsuccessful.

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